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Sickle Cell September Blood Drive

Sickle Cell Disease Awareness Blood Drives

SCD is a painful genetic blood disease that affects millions of people, who often require blood transfusions.

This September, honor patients with sickle cell disease by donating blood.

1 out of every 365 African-American children are born with sickle cell disease.


When you give, together we thrive. To help those living with sickle cell disease, Versiti is inviting you to donate at an upcoming blood drive in your community.

As a thank you, donors will receive a limited edition Versiti sickle cell awareness t-shirt, while supplies last. Be sure to tag Versiti on your social media to show support and add the hashtags #communitybeaconofhope and #sicklecellseptember.

Find your drive. Use the links below to see drives in your area.

Illinois Sickle Cell September Drives

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Indiana Sickle Cell September Drives

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Michigan Sickle Cell September Drives

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Ohio Sickle Cell September Drives

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Wisconsin Sickle Cell September Drives

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Sickle Cell Disease

  • What Causes Sickle Cell Disease?
    • SCD is inherited in the same way that people get the color of their eyes, skin and hair.
    • A person with SCD is born with it.
    • People cannot “catch” SCD from being around a person who has it.
  • What Is Sickle Cell Disease?
    • Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of inherited red blood cell disorders.
    • Healthy red blood cells are round and they move through small blood vessels carrying oxygen to all parts of the body.
    • For someone with SCD, the red blood cells become hard and sticky and look like a C-shaped farm tool called a “sickle.”
    • Sickle cells die early in comparison to non-sickle cells, which causes a constant shortage of red blood cells.
    • Sickle cells can get stuck in small blood vessels and block the flow of blood and oxygen to organs in the body. These changes in cells can cause repeated episodes of severe pain, organ damage, serious infections or even stroke.
    • Although there is no cure for sickle cell disease, blood transfusions (supplied exclusively by volunteer blood donors like you!) are a critical part of treatment. 
    • Many times, only blood transfusions can relieve the pain and complications that occur during a sickle cell episode. 
    • Blood that closely matches that of a patient is less likely to be rejected by the patient and can mean fewer complications after a transfusion.
  • Who Is Affected by Sickle Cell Disease?
    • It is estimated that SCD affects 90,000 to 100,000 people in the United States, mainly people of African descent.
    • The disease occurs among about 1 of every 365 births of African descent and among about 1 of every 36,000 births of Hispanic descent.
    • SCD affects millions of people throughout the world and is particularly common among those whose ancestors come from sub-Saharan Africa; regions in the Western Hemisphere (South America, the Caribbean and Central America); Saudi Arabia; India; and Mediterranean countries such as Turkey, Greece and Italy.

Mortality Data From Centers For Disease Control

  • Sickle cell-related death among Black or African-American children younger than 4 years of age fell by 42% from 1999 through 2002. This drop coincided with the introduction in 2000 of a vaccine that protects against invasive pneumococcal disease.
  • Before 1987, the mortality rate of children with sickle cell anemia was 68%.

Sickle Cell Disease Warriors

Mariah Roberts

Mariah Roberts

Mariah is one of nearly 100,000 Americans who suffer from this life-threatening disease. Thanks to blood donors, she has a bright future ahead.

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Shanice Williams

When she was two years old, Shanice was diagnosed with sickle cell disease.

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Porscha Burks

Porscha Burks

"By my early 20s, I felt like my disease had taken over."

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